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Significant Growth in Learning Assessment Recorded

profrobertsKEV 3245 150TAKOMA PARK, Md. (May 28) - Washington Adventist University (WAU) submitted its monitoring report April 1, in continued compliance with regional accrediting body, the Middle States Commission on Higher Education (MSCHE).   

Under the leadership of the chair of the newly formed academic assessment subcommittee, Dr. Melvin Roberts, the University demonstrated a significant increase in compliance since 2011, the time of the self-study. At that time, less than 50 percent of WAU departments had approved assessment plans in place. Today, all departments have at least one assessment plan documented, and most have curricular maps created and are documenting their learning outcomes in annual program reports.

“The real work was done by the academic departments. Without the efforts of the larger faculty in the planning and implementing stages, little progress would have been made,” Roberts said.

Over the past year, a response was required to MSCHE, on their findings from the self-study submitted and the 2012 site visit. Those processes are part of the 10-year accreditation process for MSCHE. Washington Adventist University met all 14 evaluation standard set by MSCHE.

On Standard 14, Student Learning Assessment, a monitoring report was required “documenting evidence of further implementation of an organized and sustained process to assess the achievement of student learning outcomes at the course, program, and institutional level, including (1) provision of increased institutional resources devoted to student learning outcomes assessment; (2) the integration of learning outcomes at the course, program, and institutional levels; and (3) the use of assessment results in academic planning at all levels.”

Last spring, Associate Vice President for the OIRE Janette Neufville, enlisted the services of Terra Schehr, the Associate Vice President of Institutional Research and Effectiveness at Loyola to help address inconsistencies in student learning outcomes assessment. Schehr made a presentation to the faculty at their annual colloquium last August and provided feedback and advice to departmental assessment plans during one-on-one sessions from late September through late October.

Neufville also enlisted the help of former MSCHE Vice President, Linda Suskie, to address deficiencies in learning assessment and recommend a plan to address the concerns raised by MSCHE. Suskie visited the university in September 2012 to review current Standard 14 practices and advised on the institution’s approach to student learning outcomes assessment and to the Monitoring Report.