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Women’s Ordination and the Politics of Interpretation Topics for 34th G. Arthur Keough Lectureship, March 28-29

Keough 2014 Panel





Takoma Park, MD (March 26) - The Washington Adventist University Department of Religion is hosting the 34th G. Arthur Keough Lectureship program on March 28 and 29, featuring topics that include women’s ordination and the politics of interpretation. The lectures are open to the public and will be held on and near the university campus, located at 7600 Flower Ave. in Takoma Park, Md.

On March 28 at 7 p.m., “Higher Criticism and the Resistance to Women’s Ordination: Unmasking the Issue” will be presented by Olive J. Hemmings, Ph.D., in the chapel at Richards Hall, located on campus. Hemmings is a professor of religion at Washington Adventist University (WAU) and a commissioned minister who preaches locally, nationally and internationally. She teaches Biblical Theology, Pauline Theology, introduction to the New Testament and other New Testament courses. Hemmings brings to her teachings a passion for using the cultural and historical contexts of Biblical text as it reflects social struggles, including the struggle to understand and engage the divine. She is author of the recently published book, “Sacred Texts and Social Conflict.”

Hemmings will also deliver a March 29 lecture at 10 a.m. on “The Text: Weapon or Guide?” at the Sligo Seventh-day Adventist Church, Fellowship Hall A, located at 7700 Carroll Ave. in Takoma Park.

A lecture on “Inerrancy, Adventism, and Church Unity” will presented on March 29 at 3:30 p.m. by Richard Rice, Ph.D., on campus in the chapel at Richards Hall. A professor of religion at Loma Linda University, Calif., he has served as a church pastor and is the author of numerous books and articles. His books include “When Bad Things Happen to God's People;” “Reason and the Contours of Faith;” and “The Reign of God: An Introduction to Christian Theology from a Seventh-day Adventist Perspective.”

The G. Arthur Keough Lectureship program honors the memory of a former WAU faculty member who authored such books as “Let Daniel Speak;” “Rejoicing with the Psalmist;” and “Infinitely Happy.”

This year’s program was organized by Zdravko Zack Plantak, Ph.D., chair of the Washington Adventist University Department of Religion and author of the book “The Silent Church: Human Rights and Adventist Social Ethics."

WAU Keough Lectureship - Press Release

The program schedule is as follows:

Friday, March 28, 7pm – Dr. Hemmings: “Higher Criticism and the Resistance to Women’s Ordination – Unmasking the Issue” – Richards Hall Chapel, Lower Level, Building 10

Saturday, March 29, 10am – Dr. Hemmings: Sligo Church Fellowship Hall A

Saturday, March 29, 3:30pm – Dr. Rice: “Inerrancy, Adventism, and Church Unity” Richards Hall Chapel, Lower Level, Building 10

WAU’s Bible Translation Institute Has Published New Testament for a Russian Audience

Takoma Park, MD (March 11) — The first joint edition of the modern translation of the Russian New Testament and Psalms intended for a mass audience was recently published by the Washington Adventist University (WAU) Bible Translation Institute, and copies are now on sale in bookstores across Russia.

Bible Translation Institute Director Mikhail M. Kulakov, D.Phil., is leading the project that is expected to conclude with a complete translation of the entire Bible into Russian by 2015. A professor of theology, history and philosophy in Washington Adventist University’s Department of Religion, Kulakov is working on the project began by his father. Partners in the project are the Zaoksky Theological Seminary in the Tula region of Russia, and the Biblical-Theological Institute of St. Apostle Andrew in Moscow, which is a leading academic publisher of Russian theological literature.

Copies of the New Testament translation in Russian are now available at the main book stores in Moscow, St. Petersburg, Krasnodar, Perm, Novosibirsk, Kiev, Odessa and Minsk. The release of this inter-denominational edition produced for the general public has already received positive reviews by several popular Orthodox and Protestant theological web sites and seminary journals.

“It is humbling for our team that the faculty of St. Andrew’s Biblical Theological Institute decided to publish this joint edition as a part of its prestigious series of publications of ‘Modern Biblical Studies’ in which they publish the works of renowned Biblical scholars,” said Kulakov, who is working to complete the translation of the entire Bible. “We have already launched work on the layout of the completed books of the Bible, and are anxiously anticipating the date of completion so that the new translation of the entire Bible can be distributed and read afresh by the Russian people.”

Kulakov is currently in the fourth year of a five-year sabbatical to complete the translation of the entire Bible into Russian. Working in collaboration with biblical scholars from universities across Russia, WAU’s Bible Translation Institute is an initiative in international and inter-denominational collaboration. The Institute has already published the Pentateuch, the Minor Prophets and the New Testament and the Psalms.

33rd G. Arthur Keough Lectures

WALTER BRUEGGEMANN
COLUMBIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY

keough photo web“Reperforming our Best Narrative”
Walter Brueggemann is an acclaimed author and theologian. Considered one of the most influential Old Testament scholars of the last several decades, Brueggemann has authored over 100 books and articles. He is known for his method of rhetorical criticism which, as he writes in his noted work Theology of the Old Testament (1997), views the Old Testament through the lenses of “testimony, criticism, and literacy.” Brueggemann is currently the William Marcellus McPheeters professor emeritus of Old Testament at Columbia Theological Seminary.

SEPTEMBER 20 AT 6:30 P.M., MORRISON HALL CHAPEL
Choosing an Alternative Life: “Follow me.”
This presentation will consider the ways in which the narrative of “Exodus/Wilderness/
Sinai may and must now be reenacted in the midst of our own predatory economy.

SEPTEMBER 21 AT 10:00 A.M., MORRISON HALL CHAPEL
Imagining Neighborliness: “Love thy neighbor.”
This presentation will consider the resources offered in the Book of Deuteronomy for imagining the reordering of the land of promise. The urging from that text is that we now, in our US land of promise, may again reimagine that land as a zone of neighborliness.

WAU’s Religion Department Chair Authored Four Published Articles This Past Year

plantakTakoma Park, MD (March 11) — The chair of Washington Adventist University’s Department of Religion has published four articles in the past year. The most recent, authored by Zdravko Zack Plantak, Ph.D., is “Occupy Till I Come: Relevance of the Belief of the Coming of God,” which was published in the Winter 2014 issue of Adventist Today, Vol. 22, No. 1. (pp.22-27). The piece explores Christian beliefs, perspectives and actions during the time between the first and second coming of Christ.

The article focuses on how the unknown timing of a second coming can affect believers, particularly those who anticipate an imminent advent, and those who become impatient and disappointed. The result can be overexcitement or indifference, shifting attention away from the work of helping those who are the most vulnerable and marginalized in society.

Plantak’s article concludes that “the second coming need not be an obstacle for the involvement in human rights but should become, although not necessarily the primary, at least an additional incentive for moral life in society and being concerned for justice, equality, and peacemaking.”

Other articles published by Plantak during the year are “Creation Care in a Careless World,” published in the April-June 2013 issue of Dynamic Steward, addressing the issue of environmental concern and responsibility; “A Call to Restore God’s Justice” which was published in the Summer 2013 issue of The Journal of Adventist Education; and an article on the meaning of life, entitled "To Live is to Love" which appeared in the Summer 2013 issue of Adventist Today.

Major Milestone for Russian Bible Translation Project

russian8 sm crpTAKOMA PARK, Md. (Aug. 28)- Printing of the first North American edition of the Russian New Testament and the Psalms, produced by the Washington Adventist University (WAU) Bible Translation Institute in partnership with Zaoksky Theological Seminary in Russia, has been completed by Pacific Press, Nampa, Idaho.

A dedication service was held, August 26, at the Press’ headquarters, and on September 5, 3ABN taped a special program to mark the new development.

“This summer has been immensely profitable and both our inter-denominational teams in Zaoksky, Russia, and here at WAU, are working around the clock to stay on target,” said Michael Kulakov, professor of theology, history and philosophy at WAU; chief editor for the translation project and director of the Russian Bible Translation Institute. “By God’s grace, we have completed work on the poetic books of the Bible and are currently working on the books of Joshua and Judges. The books of the Major and Minor prophets have also been completed.”

“We appreciate continued prayers from the WAU family for the work of our teams during this most decisive year,” he added.

Kulakov is currently in the fourth year of a five year sabbatical to complete the translation of the entire Bible into Russian by 2015. Seeing the first North American edition of the New Testament and the Psalms in print, was particularly moving for him, Kulakov said, since it was his late father, Dr. Mikhail P. Kulakov Sr. who founded the Institute at Zaoksky and worked tirelessly for over a decade to produce the translation of the New Testament and the Psalms.