Breadcrumbs

Music: Prospective Students

Applications for Admission

Entrance Requirements

Frequently Asked Questions

Music in the Interactive Academic Bulletin for 2013-2014

 

ADMISSIONS AND AUDITIONS

Applications for Admission – The following applications are for admission into our Music Department Degree programs. Before these form can be processed, you must make application for admission to Washington Adventist University. Apply to the University first! Once you have completed all aspects of your application to the University, fill out this form before arriving for your audition. Please attach a list of repertoire studied in the last four years. Also, attach any relevant résumé, concert programs, letters of reference, etc., you may wish to submit. Please acquaint us with your accomplishments to date to better give us a picture of your potential. Auditions are held during University Preview days or by personal appointment made through the department. Under very unusual circumstances, such as long distance, an audition may be submitted by DVD. Call or email for more information: music@wau.edu and (301) 891-4025.

Admission Form - BA Music

Admission Form - BM Performance

Admission Form - BM Education

Entrance Requirements – Acceptance into one of the degree programs in this department is contingent upon a successful audition. This audition must demonstrate aptitude and skill, in a chosen field of concentration, sufficient to successfully pursue the curriculum. Examination in the major applied music area is administered during the registration week to determine the student’s qualification for entering MUPI 144.

AUDITION REQUIREMENTS BY PERFORMING AREA

KEYBOARD

Piano

1. Perform three pieces of contrasting style and historical period. An audition should include a piece by J.S. Bach, a first movement of a classical sonata, and either a Romantic or Contemporary piece.

2. Major/minor scales and arpeggios

3. Sight-reading

Organ

1. Perform two contrasting pieces including a piece by J.S. Bach and a work from the Romantic or Contemporary periods of music.

2. Sight-read a hymn

PERCUSSION

Snare drum

1. Perform an etude

2. Demonstrate rudiments

3. Sight-reading

Mallet instruments

1. Perform a solo piece or etude

2. Scales and arpeggios

3. Sight-reading

Timpani

1. Perform an etude utilizing 2, 3, or 4 drums

2. Demonstrate proficiency with pitch matching, intervals, and rolls

3. Sight-reading

STRINGS

Violin and cello

1. Perform a) an unaccompanied movement by J.S. Bach and b) a movement of a post-Baroque concerto or sonata.

2. Major/minor scales in three octaves

3. Sight-reading

Viola

1. Perform two contrasting pieces of applicant’s choice

2. Major/minor scales in three octaves

3. Sight-reading

Double bass

1. Perform two pieces of applicant’s choice

2. Major/minor scales in two octaves

3. Sight-reading

VOICE

1. Perform two selections from the classical vocal repertoire; one piece may be in English and the second in a language other than English.

2. Sight-reading

WINDS AND BRASS

1. Perform two contrasting pieces (etudes and excerpts are acceptable)

2. Major and chromatic scales

3. Sight-reading

CLASSICAL GUITAR AND HARP

1. Perform two contrasting pieces

2. Scales and arpeggios

3. Sight-reading

Frequently Asked Questions

Do I need to be a music major or minor in order to take applied lessons or be a member of one of your music organizations?

Applied lessons are available to all WAU students for credit or noncredit. Participation in our music organizations is by audition and open to all WAU students. Applications for our music organizations is available here.

Do I have to audition to become a music major?

Yes. Acceptance into one of the degree programs in the music department is contingent upon a successful audition. This audition must demonstrate aptitude and skill, in a chosen field of concentration, sufficient to successfully pursue the curriculum. Applications are available here.

Do I need to have advanced training in order to apply?

Yes. The music business is highly competitive, and we expect a high level of commitment and talent from our music majors. Please look at our audition requirements for your applied area for more information.

How do I schedule an audition?

Start by filling out an application to get the ball rolling. You may also contact us directly at music@wau.edu or 301 891 4025.

Will I get to go on a really cool tour if I join the choir/band/orchestra?

In the last couple of years, our organizations have traveled to the Cayman Islands, Jamaica, Mexico, Europe, and performed at the National Gallery of Art, Lincoln Center, and Carnegie Hall.

Are there music scholarships, and how do I get one?

Our largest music scholarships are merit-based awards for being in a music organization. Other music scholarships are also available. All are awarded based on your audition.

How big are the music classes?

One of the best things about being a music major at WAU is the individual attention student receives. Our class sizes are intimate and applied lessons are one-on-one.

Why should I come to WAU to be a music major?

We are in a vibrant cultural part of the world at WAU. As such, we have the finest faculty available who are all at the tops of their respective fields. As a Seventh-day Adventist institution, we seek to be Christ-like in all that we do and thus serve as both musical and character mentors. Finally, being a small department allows all of our students to receive an individual and personally unique learning experience that will best prepare students for a career in music.

Music: Current Students

Welcome

Music Major Handbook

Music in the Interactive Academic Bulletin for 2013-2014

Jury Examinations

Group Recitals and Performances

Junior and Senior Recitals

Senior Recital

Music Libraries

Concert Halls

Libraries

Museums

Churches

Conservatories and Universities

Theaters and Other Venues

Welcome

Welcome to the Washington Adventist University Music Department. We hope your experience as a music major will be richly rewarding and enjoyable. As a department we are constantly trying to find more efficient methods to help you grow musically, intellectually and spiritually. This handbook is an important tool for that growing process. On the following pages you will find information that is vital to your success as a music major at WAU. Read it very carefully and ask us to explain any information that seems unclear. We believe that our success as music department faculty is measured not only by our ability to help you define and achieve the highest possible musical goals, but by our willingness to address your concerns as students and music majors.

Music_Major_Handbook 2012-2013

Jury Examinations

Jury examinations are an opportunity for students to perform under a pressure situation and for faculty to effectively evaluate their progress. Juries are held at the end of each semester for students registered for MUPI 144, 274, 344, or 474. As explained in the handbook, the jury grade counts as one-third of the final Applied Music grade. Each qualifying student is expected to sign up in the music office for a specific jury time. Any student requesting exemption from the jury examination for any reason must obtain permission from the chairman, otherwise an F grade will be recorded.

The Jury Performance Form (also available at the Music Office) must be completed and returned to the office no later than the Monday prior to exam week. Failure to follow this procedure will automatically lower the examinee's jury grade by one letter grade (A becomes A-). In addition, one copy of all music to be performed must be given to the jury chairman at the time of examination. Any costs involved in presenting these copies to the jury are the responsibility of the student.

Group Recitals and Performances

Because music is ultimately a public art, and because confidence during public performance is gained only through experience, WAU requires all music majors to perform in a Performance Class during each Fall semester and in a Music Major Recital during each Spring semester.

Students should provide the Music Office with the title and composer of the work they will be performing one week prior to their assigned performance date. Studio classes meet at the discretion of the instructor. In addition, music majors are encouraged to give joint or solo recitals with the permission of their teachers and the department chairman.

Junior and Senior Recitals

All music majors will present a recital during their junior year. Bachelor of Music in Performance majors will give a full solo recital (consisting of at least 1 hour of music) while music majors in all other programs will give a half solo recital (consisting of at least 30 minutes of music).

In order to perform on a Junior recital, all students must first submit a completed Application for Junior Recital form to the chairman at the time of the first semester junior jury and schedule a Pre-Recital Audition.

The Pre-Recital Audition must:

– be organized with the department chairman,

– occur no later than 4 weeks prior to the desired recital date, and

– include all music to be performed at the scheduled recital.

In addition, the student must provide one copy of all repertoire for the faculty panel at the time of the scheduled audition.

Performance majors will present the entire junior recital from memory. Non-keyboard performance majors may perform one sonata with score on the junior recital. All non-performance majors will present at least one work from memory. Chamber music for 3 or more performers is not permitted on the junior recital.

Senior Recital

Music majors will normally present a solo recital during their senior year of study. Music Education majors are permitted to give their senior recital during the first semester of their teaching internship but are not permitted to do so during the second semester of their internship. Students whose applied emphasis is composition shall prepare a recital of their own compositions, at least one of which should be of major proportion. Chamber music for 3 or more performers is permitted on the senior recital. Further requirements are listed below according to course of study.

Seniors graduating with a BM in Performance:

Candidates for the Bachelor of Music in Performance, will present a full recital, to include at least one major work for the instrument/voice, not more than one chamber work, and a variety of other literature representing various styles and periods of composition. Recital literature chosen must reflect the standard indicated in the literature requirements for the Upper Division applied music level. Performance majors must present the recital from memory, with the exception of one chamber music selection. Non-keyboard performance majors may perform one sonata with score on the senior recital. However, on any given recital not more than one work may be performed from score.

Seniors graduating with a BM in Education:

Candidates for the Bachelor of Music in Education, will present at least a half recital during their senior year. Literature chosen must reflect the standards indicated in the literature requirements for the appropriate level. One major work must be included and performed without score.

Seniors graduating with a BA in Performance

Candidates for the Bachelor of Arts in Performance, will present at least a half recital during their senior year. Literature chosen must reflect the standards indicated in the literature requirements for the appropriate level. One major work must be included and performed without score.

All students must submit a completed Application for Senior Recital form to the chairman at the time of the first semester junior jury and schedule a Pre-Recital Audition.

The Pre-Recital Audition must:

– be organized with the department chairman,

– occur no later than 4 weeks prior to the desired recital date, and

– include all music to be performed at the scheduled recital.

In addition, the student must provide one copy of all repertoire for the faculty panel at the time of the scheduled audition.

Additional Student Resources

Music Libraries

Washington Adventist University (ext. 4217)

www.wau.edu/weislibrary

Holds most general research sources and provides a fair coverage of mainstream composers and performers.

University of Maryland, College Park (301-405-9217)

www.lib.umd.edu

Probably the best local university music library. Fair journal and instrumental sheet music collection. Strengths include piano music and general research. Unfortunately, you are not allowed to listen to any of the University-owned recordings or check out volumes without a UM ID card.

Catholic University (202-319-5424)

http://libraries.cua.edu

The second best local university music library. Strengths include early music/sacred music and general instrumental and vocal sheet music.

Peabody Conservatory, Baltimore (410-659-8160)

http://catalog.library.jhu.edu

A good library with a broad collection of general books and sheet music.

Library of Congress, Music Research & Sheet Music Holdings (202-707-5507)

http://catalog.loc.gov

A phenomenally large music library (it really is one of the world’s best) that is also quite user friendly. Go there if you have a clear idea of what you are looking for and can’t find it anywhere else.

Library of Congress, Recordings and Facilities for Listening (202-707-7833)

http://catalog.loc.gov

An amazing archive of recorded sound.

Concert Halls

John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts

2700 F Street, NW

Washington, DC 20566

(202) 467-4600; (800) 444-1324

Metro: Foggy Bottom/GWU (orange/blue line)

Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall

1212 Cathedral Street

Baltimore, MD 21201

(410) 783-8000; (877) BSO-1444

Strathmore Performing Arts Center

Music Center: 5301 Tuckerman Lane

North Bethesda, MD 20852

(301) 581-5100

Mansion at Strathmore:

10701 Rockville Pike

North Bethesda, MD 20852

(301) 581-5109

Metro: Grosvenor-Strathmore (red line)

Wolf Trap Foundation for the Performing Arts

Filene Center: 1551 Trap Road

The Barns: 1635 Trap Road

Vienna, VA 22182

(877) WOLFTRAP

Metro: Shuttle bus from West Falls Church-VT/UVA (orange line)

DAR Constitution Hall

1776 D Street, NW

Washington, DC 20006

(202) 628-4780

Metro: Farragut North (red line)

Modell Performing Arts Center (Lyric Opera House)

140 W. Mt. Royal Avenue

Baltimore, MD 21201

(410) 685-5086

Libraries

Folger Shakespeare Library

201 East Capitol Street, SE

Washington, DC 20003

(202) 544-7077

Metro: Union Station (red line)

Library of Congress

101 Independence Ave., SE

Washington, DC 20540

(202) 707-5502

Metro: Union Station (red line) or Capitol South (orange/blue line)

Museums

National Geographic Society

1145 17th St., NW

Washington, DC 20036

(800) 647-5463

Metro: Farragut West (orange/blue line)

National Gallery of Art

4th and Constitution Avenue, NW

Washington, DC 20565

(202) 737-4215

Metro: Judiciary Square (red line) or Smithsonian (orange/blue line)

Phillips Collection

1600 21st Street, NW

Washington, DC 20009

(202) 387-2151

Metro: Dupont Circle (red line)

Churches

Chevy Chase Presbyterian

One Chevy Chase Circle

Washington, DC 20015

(202) 363-2202

Metro: Friendship Heights (red line)

Christ Lutheran Church

701 S. Charles Street

Baltimore, MD 21230

(410) 752-7179

Second Presbyterian Church

4200 Saint Paul Street

Baltimore, MD 21218

(443) 759-3309

Washington National Cathedral

3101 Wisconsin Avenue, NW

Washington, DC 20016

(202) 537-6200

Metro: Tenleytown/AU (red line)

Spencerville Seventh-day Adventist Church

16325 New Hampshire Avenue

Silver Spring, MD 20905

(301) 384-2920

Conservatories and Universities

Lisner Auditorium—George Washington University

730 21st Street, NW

Washington, DC 20052

(202) 994-6800

Metro: Foggy Bottom/GWU (orange/blue line)

Peabody Conservatory

1 East Mount Vernon Place

Baltimore, MD 21202

(410) 234-4500

Shriver Hall—Johns Hopkins University

3400 N. Charles Street

Baltimore, MD 21218-2698

(410) 516-7164

Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center—University of Maryland, College Park

Stadium Drive and Route 193

College Park, MD 20742

(301) 405-ARTS

Theaters and Other Venues

Blues Alley

1073 Wisconsin Ave., NW

Washington, DC 20007

(202) 337-4141

Warner Theater

513 13th Street, NW

Washington, D.C. 20004

(202) 783-4000

Metro: Metro Center (red line)

An die Musik

409 North Charles Street

Baltimore, MD 21201

(410) 385-2638; (888) 221-6170

Hyppodrome Theatre (France-Merrick Performing Arts Center)

12 North Eutaw Street

Baltimore, MD 21201

(410) 837-7400

Music Organizations

Music Organizations


Baroque Ensemble: Formed in 1998, the Baroque Ensemble provides a distinctive musical feast for local concert halls and churches. It features such unusual instruments as the cornet and crumhorn, as well as the more familiar recorders, strings, guitar, percussion, and woodwind instruments. Vocal music is also part of the Ensemble’s repertoire.
 

Washington Brass Quintet


An advanced touring brass ensemble that consists of ten brass instrument players and three percussion players. Membership is by audition and members are eligible for a music scholarship. Performances include area schools, churches, and weekend tours. Call ext. 4025.
 

Washington Collegiate Chorale


WAU’s large touring choir is open to all students by audition. It performs classical, sacred, and secular music on campus, in local churches and community centers. It performs extensively in North America and overseas as the schedule permits. Call ext. 4025.
 

Washington Concert Winds


Open to students and members of the University community by audition. Performances include three to four campus events and one weekend trip per semester. Scholarships are awarded to eligible students. Call ext. 4025.
 
Honor String Quartet


A small group that strives for an unusual level of performance excellence, the Honor Quartet provides a distinctive musical outlet for WAU students.
 

New England Youth Ensemble (also New England Symphonic Ensemble) at WashingtonAdventist University


WAU’s internationally renowned orchestra is open to students with instrumental skills. Membership is by audition. This chamber orchestra performs classical, sacred, and secular music on campus, in churches, concert halls, and tours extensively in North America and overseas, schedule permitting. Call ext. 4025.
 

ProMusica


ProMusica is open to all students by audition. It is a select chamber choir, singing repertoire appropriate to such an organization. All finalists receive choral scholarships. Members of ProMusica must also be members of the Washington Collegiate Chorale. Call ext. 4025.

Music: Performing Organizations

Admission to Performing Organizations – Acceptance into our elite music organizations is by audition. Merit scholarships are available to outstanding performers.

Admission Form - Choirs (Pro Musica and Columbia Collegiate Chorale)

Admission Form - Washington Concert Winds

Admission Form - New England Youth Ensemble of Washington Adventist University

The Washington Concert Winds

The Washington Concert Winds are a select wind ensemble (band) fashioned after the Eastman Wind Ensemble founded by Frederick Fennell in 1952. The purpose of the smaller wind ensemble was to establish a new medium, consisting mainly of one instrument per part, and it was this model that the Washington Concert Winds followed.

The band’s repertoire is representative of the finest university level British and American wind classics. In addition, the group performs outstanding arrangements of hymn tunes and classical music for use in sacred concerts which are frequently given in church settings.

Under the direction of Bruce Wilson, the Concert Winds have successfully toured the United States and the world attracting students from as far away as Australia. Many of the band members receive a yearly scholarship for performing in the group. Typical performances will include a bi-annual international concert tour, a Christmas concert at the White House Ellipse in Washington D.C. and performances in various churches and concert halls.

PRO MUSICA of Washington Adventist University:

The Pro Musica of Washington Adventist University was established in 1962 by the late Paul Hill, founding director of the acclaimed Paul Hill Chorale, later known as the Master Chorale of Washington. The Pro Musica still draws its membership largely from the student body and the alumni of the University and for the last 17 years has been under the direction of James Bingham. This approximately 24 member auditioned choir performs both sacred and secular advanced choral repertoire and all of its student members receive a scholarship.

Under James Bingham’s leadership, this choir, along with the larger choir of the University, the Columbia Collegiate Chorale, has undertaken a heavy schedule of services and concerts, traveling extensively both nationally and internationally. It has appeared in numerous prestigious venues such as Carnegie Hall, New York, the National Gallery of Art, and the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, Washington, D.C., as well as in other leading concert halls and cathedrals and churches both within the United States and abroad. The choir has made numerous recordings but has received extraordinary acclaim for its recordings: Christmas – Music for Harp and Ladies Choir and Lamentations – Music of Tenebrae.

COLUMBIA COLLEGIATE CHORALE of Washington Adventist University:

The Columbia Collegiate Chorale of Washington Adventist University was established in 1994 by its present director James Bingham and draws its membership largely from the student body of Washington Adventist University. Incorporated within the chorale is a smaller select chamber choir, the Pro Musica of Washington Adventist University, which was established in 1962 by the late Paul Hill. This large choral organization performs both standard a cappella and accompanied works and maintains a heavy performance schedule.

It has appeared in numerous prestigious venues such as Carnegie Hall, New York, the National Gallery of Art, and the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, Washington, D.C., as well as in other leading concert halls and cathedrals both within the United States and abroad. The choir has a number of recordings to its credit, receiving extraordinary acclaim for its recording of Louis Vierne’s Messe Solennelle in C minor. Of its recording, O Jesus Sweet: Music for a Christmas Night, which includes the extended work Dancing Day by John Rutter, the composer has written: “I could not wish for a finer interpretation of my piece.”

The mission of the Columbia Collegiate Chorale is to represent the best of American culture and the finest of Christian values through the study and performance of the sacred music of the great masters.

The New England Youth Ensemble at Washington Adventist University:

The New England Youth Ensemble (NEYE), founded in 1969 by Dr. Virginia-Gene Rittenhouse is one of the most internationally traveled Youth/Student Orchestras in America. In 1994 the NEYE became the resident orchestra of Washington Adventist University and has since continued to enjoy wide-spread critical acclaim. In 2006 long-time performing member and WAU alumnus, Preston Hawes, joined the faculty of Music Department to collaborate with Dr. Rittenhouse in the administrative and artistic leadership of the Ensemble. The Ensemble has performed at the Jerash Festival in Jordan under the auspices of HM Queen Noor of Jordon, Vilanov Palace in Warsaw Poland for President Ford, Henry Kissinger, and First Secretary Edward Gierek and most recently the Ensemble performed under the direction of Preston Hawes at the Thailand Cultural Center for HRH Princess Sirivannavari Nariratana and numerous other dignitaries and world leaders.

The Ensemble performs many of the orchestral standards while taking advantage of the opportunity afforded in performing extensively with the Columbia Choral, also of WAU. This allows NEYE members to increase their knowledge of repertoire that includes the less often performed sacred works for orchestra-choir combinations. The NEYE mission is simple: to bring great music to a searching world that is performed, in the words of J.S. Bach, “to the Glory of God and the Refreshment of the Spirit”. The NEYE is especially concerned about the plight of children orphaned by the scourge of AIDS and is a proud sponsor of the Zimbabwe Orphanage Project.

Carnegie Scholars

The Carnegie Scholars Program of the New England Youth Ensemble (NEYE) at Washington Adventist University (WAU) is a unique mentorship program that brings qualified members of the NEYE by audition to the stage of Carnegie Hall in collaboration with MidAmerica Productions, and mentor-members of the professional branch of the ensemble, the New England Symphonic Ensemble (NESE). The NESE has performed over 200 concerts in this famous venue under the direction of numerous well-known conductors, including John Rutter, which whom the NESE has held a long-standing friendship, sharing together well over 100 concerts. 2011 marked the much-anticipated NESE expansion into the halls at Lincoln Center.

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